Canvas on the iPad? Definitely! | InstructureCon 2013

Canvas on the iPad? Definitely! | InstructureCon 2013


RACHEL MURPHY: We’re excited to
be here today to share with you our Canvas project. Our session is titled today
“Canvas on the iPad? Definitely!” I’m Rachel, and
our goal today is to share with you how our teachers and
students have been creating projects on the iPad and then
using those projects as assignment submissions inside
of the Canvas app. So Canyon School District
is literally just up and over the mountain. If you were to jump on a
mountain bike right now, you’d be there in a couple
of quick hours. And we’re a large school
district of about 35,000 students and about
1,500 teachers. And in this next school year, we
will be implementing Canvas in all of our secondary schools,
and for us that’s 6 through 12. So about 14,000 students will
be impacted as well as about 1,000 teachers. So we’re really excited about
our project next year. JARED WARD: My name is Jared
Ward, and I want to just talk a little bit about what our
Canvas implementation has looked like. So I’m sure most of you have
implemented Canvas with no bumps in the road, no
problems, no trouble whatsoever, but ours was a
little messy at first. We had a small group of teachers
that helped us to frame what Canvas was going to
look like, how we were going to use it, how it could benefit
our students, and we spent a few months just trying
to get a grasp and understanding of how this could
impact our classroom. Our sessions and our trainings
kind of grew from there, and over the past year our impact
was we had about 1,400 students who were using Canvas
actively in their classroom. Once we added iPads to the mix,
this is where it started to become pretty
amazing to us. We got pretty excited about
using an iPad in the classroom very early on in our experience
as education technology specialists. And adding Canvas as a tool to
manage those has been a pretty good experience. Our idea was that we would
have students help us understand and learn how to
create projects, interact with each other, communicate, and
collaborate using that device, and that Canvas would be a place
to host all of those projects, a place for them
to turn in projects. So as we’ve been training
teachers, we tell them all the time that this process of
working from digitizing in your classroom to hopefully
redefining your classroom, it’s going to take time. And we use the SAMR model
for that conversation. If you’re not familiar with
that, we have all of our slides online. You’re welcome to Google
search SAMR model. You’ll find versions
of this all over. But this is what that time
looks like to us. We do expect teachers to
digitize some of what they’re doing as they get started just
so they get comfortable with the content, with the
iPads, with Canvas. And then we’re pushing them to
redefine and rethink what they’re doing in their
classroom. So instead of just typing a
paper on a computer or typing the paper on the iPad, we’re
talking about creating video projects or digital storytelling
projects. Hopefully, it’s creating ideas
and collaborations that weren’t possible before an iPad came into their classroom. That’s really our goal. And it’s worked pretty
well so far. RACHEL MURPHY: So we have all
of our resources online for you, and our website is just
canvasontheipad.weebly.com. We just want to point out a few
things that we have here that we think will be really
useful for you. So first of all at the very top
on the tabs, we have Our Presentation. It’s just to tab called
Our Presentation. It’s all of these slides in case
you want to go back and reference it later. Another thing we have on our
site is a link to our complete list of apps that we put on
the student sets of iPads. We organized our app list by
project category, and we chose nearly 100 free apps that fit a
certain type of project that the students could complete
completely on the iPad. Some of them are web based, so
they could actually go home and also do it on a computer. But since we’re focusing
on the iPads, that was one of our goals. We had a three point criteria
for choosing your apps. We first of all wanted
them to be free. We didn’t want schools to have
to purchase and buy into the volume purchasing program. We didn’t want additional costs
for this project to be successful. That was the first thing we were
really concerned with. The second thing that we used in
selecting your apps was the number of ads. So a lot of free ads are really
ad intensive, and it’s annoying and distracting
to students. So we chose apps that were very
limited in their use of ads as a funding source. And then our third criteria was
to make sure that they had some sort of export or save
method or download method so that then they could be used
as assignment submission inside of Canvas. JARED WARD: And one of the
things we also looked at were apps that could connect
with each other. We have a lot of
research apps. We’ll show you a couple of apps
that connect very well with other apps within
the iPad. So you can create projects, save
them to Dropbox, export them as an email. So we’ll show a lot of those. And I think one thing that we
maybe didn’t mention is that we have iPad classroom
carts, so we’re not a one-to-one program. We’re not sending the devices
home with the students, so we’re looking for ways to
connect the projects that they’re creating possibly at
home with submissions in Canvas and then also being
able to import those back to the iPad. So we’re not a one to one but
we do have several carts of iPads in all of our secondary
schools and we’re adding to those every year. RACHEL MURPHY: One of the
struggles with having a cart situation in the schools is that
in many of these apps, students have to remember to
sign out of their accounts before they leave. And so management was a huge
part of the teacher training that we did with the teachers,
so that they had assigned iPads so that if a student,
the next day didn’t have a project there, they knew who
had the iPad before them. They had procedures for if a
student isn’t signed out of something to notify the teacher,
make sure that that’s communicated back, and it’s
work pretty well. The third thing on the site,
so besides our presentation and beside our complete app
list, we also have categories. We have five categories of
projects that students can create on the iPad, and inside
each of these we have our favorite five or the most used
by students, the five most used in these categories. And these are some of the
apps that we’re going to demonstrate today, and we’ll
talk a little bit more about these folders in a little bit. So we want to make sure that
it’s clear that this has been a shifting gears idea for
teachers, that the submissions in Canvas make it very easy to
have papers that are submitted and SpeedGrader does a great job
with text-type documents. And we really wanted teachers
to think outside of the box. How do you create a video
project and shift the gears for the types of projects that
you’re asking your students to complete, maybe in a way, trying
to get to more of those higher levels inside of
Bloom’s Taxonomy. So there are basically four
methods we’re going to talk to you about today, and we’re going
to walk you through the steps for each of
these methods. The first method
is just Canvas. If you are inside of Canvas
and you need to submit an assignment, there are certain
types of assignments that you can select right from Canvas. So that’s the simplest method. Another method is to email. Many of the apps will let you
email your completed file to yourself, and so that’s a method
that we teach students. The button at the bottom is the
Share button, and you’ve seen that I’m sure in many of
your apps, so you can share out in a number of different
ways, and we’ll walk you through a couple
of those ways. And then the last way is what
we call the Download button. Is it what we call it? Not even really sure, but that’s
our download picture, and that’s what the button
looks like inside of many of the apps. So let’s go ahead and start
walking through some of the step by steps. So the first method is to
upload from Canvas. And what this looks like on
the app, which in case you were in one of the sessions
yesterday, we’ll be changing it. It looks phenomenal, but we did
learn that the assignments submissions steps will be
staying fairly similar to what we’re showing you today. They haven’t redesigned how
assignments are submitted. So even with the new app, these instructions should help you. So they’ll choose their course
inside of Canvas, and they’ll find the assignment that
they need to submit. So here at the bottom,
we have a video assignment, for example. They’ll be a Submit button
inside of every assignment. They’ll click on the
Submit button. And then inside of Canvas,
there is a Student Files section. And this file section will allow
you to either choose something that’s saved in your
camera library, your photo library, Or If students want
to, they could create a project on the fly using the
camera video project or just a photography project and
submit it right through Canvas directly. But we’re going to show you
the example of choosing it from your photo library. The first thing you’ll need to
do is tell Canvas it’s OK to access your photo library, and
then from your list of folders, you’ll choose where
that project lives. You’ll select your project. You’ll have a Preview button,
and this is a video project, so you’ll notice that right down
inside of before I hit Submit, I can watch my project
to make sure that this was the right project that I wanted to
submit that it had all the requirements needed
for this project. When I decided that it is ready
to submit, I just click on the Use button. I want to point out that on all
these slides, we use these little pink arrows, so that kind
of shows you the steps when you go back if
you use any of this with your teachers. Then it drops the video into the
files, and it will select it with a little yellow box,
and you just click on, make sure your selected on the
one that you want to use, and hit Submit. And that by far, is the
easiest method. Not all apps save to the camera
library to make that function easy. So the next way that we show
students is how to email the project to yourself. The one that I’m going
to show you today is actually a Splice project. Splice is an iPhone app, but
it’s my favorite video app for editing video and making
a video in a classroom. A lot of people use iMovie,
but that’s a paid one so Splice is a free one and the
ads are very limited in it. But many video projects
work the same way. There’s others ones that you
can find too that you might like that will save right
to the camera roll. So the first thing you do, you
create your project in Splice, and you’ll click the Preview
button, which is in the top corner of Splice, and you’ll
click the Export button. Many video editors will have
these two buttons, so you’ll click Preview and Export,
and then you’ll choose your file size. We tell students to choose the
lowest file size option possible because most often
these projects aren’t meant to be shown on a large screen,
so they can be a smaller resolution. Maybe they’re going to be
submitted into a YouTube channel down the road or played
just on a computer screen for other students. And so file size for us
is, we recommend the lowest one that it allows. It also will help you when it
comes time to email it to yourself depending on which
email service you have and what the restrictions
are on that. It will render your video
projects, and then it will take a few minutes. When it’s done though, it will
tell you that your project has been saved to the camera roll. And now I can go back to my
camera roll, find my project, and there’s that Share button
that many of the apps have up in the top corner. I’ll click on the Share button
and some of my choices here will pop up, and this one
I can actually submit it directly to YouTube, which is an
option that we’ll show you later how you can use a web
link to submit your assignments, but for
this example, we’re going to email it. You’ll create your email
message, and the email, when it comes into your email, will
be a file that needs to be downloaded first, so the
students will click on it once to download it and then they’ll
click and hold. Once it’s finished downloading,
you click and hold and the Open In
options open up. And this will happen on any file
type that you have inside of your email. And one of your Open In
options is Canvas. So we’ll open it in a Canvas,
and it will say this project has been submitted
to your files. That’s that section inside of
Canvas where all of your materials are held. And then students walk
through kind of the same process as before. They’ll click on the course that
they need to submit the assignment to. They’ll choose the assignment
that they need to submit the project to. They’ll click on the
Submit button. And then this time they just
have to scroll through the content that’s in their files
until they find the project that they want to submit. They’ll click on it once to get
that yellow box, and then they’ll hit Submit. Those are two ways that we’ve
been really successful and two of the easiest ways, I think. JARED WARD: All right. Then similar to opening
something from your mail app is an Open In feature that’s
inside of most apps. So the example I’m going to
show today is Dropbox. We like Dropbox a lot because
again, students aren’t taking their iPads home. They’re working at
home on projects. They are working on
other devices. They can save their projects
to Dropbox and then use the iPad to access their
Dropbox files and submit them in Canvas. And this one’s pretty simple. They open the Dropbox app. They’ve already created
their project wherever else it might be. They open the Dropbox app and
locate the file that they’d like to submit, then they click
the Open In or Download button, select Open In,
Open in Canvas. You see it’s a very similar
layout to what happened in the Mail app. When you say Open in Canvas,
the Canvas app launches immediately just as Rachel
showed from the male example. That Canvas app immediately
launches. You get the message that your
presentation is ready to be accessed as a file in Canvas
and the same process. You navigate to the project that
you’re looking for inside of your class, click Submit,
and locate the file, and submit it as your assignment. So we love Dropbox. It connects with so many other
apps, and it connects with other things that students may
do on the web or on other computers in their lab,
so Dropbox is definitely one we recommend. The next thing we want to show
you is how to copy a link. Haiku Deck is a great
example for this. Haiku Deck, if you haven’t seen
it before, it’s a great way to make really beautiful,
really simple presentations very quickly. And when you’re done with your
presentation, you can share it in a number of ways including
posting the presentation online and then accessing
it as a link. RACHEL MURPHY: If you have any
Web 2.0-type website that you have your students create
projects in or any Web 2.0-type app, this method will
work for you as well. JARED WARD: We work with a lot
of students who create digital portfolios, e-portfolios, so
they may submit a project or post a project to their blog
or to their website. So they can use the same process
to copy the web link from their website
into Canvas. So inside of Haiku Deck, I’ve
created my project. I click the Share button. Once I select the share button,
I need to set up a couple of preferences to be able
to publish it to the web. So I do need to set a title. I need to decide if it’s going
to be public, private, or restricted. We recommend public. We’ve seen problems with
students trying to share. If it’s private, only
they can view it. Only they have access
to the link. If it’s restricted, people who
have the link can view it, but we had problems with students
and teachers being able to view restricted links
to Haiku Deck. So for now, we’re recommending
make them public. And then you do need to
select a category. Education is right
there at the top. We usually just say,
pick that one. It works great. But you can choose another
category if you like, and you click Publish. Then you have a host of options
for where to publish this to, where to share it. You can share on Facebook,
Twitter. You can send it as an email. If you choose the PowerPoint
Keynote option, it sends the presentation as a PowerPoint
to an email address. It then can be manipulated. You can add video. Haiku Deck doesn’t handle
videos, so you can add videos to your presentation in
PowerPoint or other places where you might work on
your presentations. We’re going to use the
Copy URL option. Soon as you click
that, you get a message that says, success. Your link has been copied
to your clipboard. Then you launch the
Canvas app. Same process. Locate the assignment. Enter the URL. Paste it in, and submit
the assignment. What’s nice about this step is
you do get a web preview right underneath the URL
submission area. Canvas app, I’m not sure if this
will change with the new app, but the Canvas app doesn’t
really tell you if your assignment has
been submitted. So after you click Submit, you
just kind of go back to this spot whether you’re not
sure if it’s been submitted are not. Sometimes you will see a
Resubmit Assignment button. Sometimes it takes a while for
that happen, but the preview lets you know that you’re link
is working, that that’s the preview that the teacher is
going to see when they view it in SpeedGrader. RACHEL MURPHY: So some apps do
it all, and you’ll notice that many apps will allow you
multiple submission methods, and nobody does this better than
Explain Everything, which is actually a paid apps, but
it’s the best app to demonstrate how this looks. So some of the other apps that
utilize this are things like Dropbox, your photo library. You can do PDFs this way. Just a bunch of apps will have
multiple submissions. So inside of Explain Everything
down in the bottom corner, you’ll notice that it
has a File button, a Movie button, a Download button, and
when you click on those, it brings up a ton of options. So many of your apps are
starting to have more than one method built into them. So first of all, when I click
on the video files, it shows me that I can export this image
to an email address. I can export it to a book or to
my camera roll, and there’s even this More option that will
allow me to export it to Dropbox, Google Drive, so many
options for submissions. It also has a Save function. So even though the other button
had a Save to Camera Roll, you have another way to
say it, or you can rename your file and save it directly
back to your iPad. And I already mentioned a little
bit about the More options, but you can export it
directly to YouTube as well. So just a ton of different
ways that students could either add it through their
photo library, email it to themselves, use a web link, all
those methods can be used inside of many of the apps. JARED WARD: So this is exporting
on steroids. We ran out of arrows. I think we used up
all the ink. But this is what Explain
Everything looks like when you click that More option. You can see that you can send it
as a video, a PDF, a video, an image, a project. And this is where it
gets really cool. This is that re-imagining,
redesigning education. If we’re talking about not
just putting an awesome colored coat of paint
on something that’s structurally flawed– I love that quote from
this morning– that’s everything that
we’re talking about. It really summed up what we’re
looking to do in our schools. If you export this as a project,
that saves it as a unique files type that’s its
unique to Explain Everything. So a student can save their
part of the project. They’re recording, and
annotating, and drawing over a presentation. They can save that project to
Dropbox in a shared folder. Other students can access
it at their part. Save it back to Dropbox. So it’s a way to communicate,
collaborate, share, again, in ways that weren’t possible
before an iPad went into their classroom. So this is our website. This is a screen shot of one of
the pages on our website. We’ve got the apps organized
by category in our top five on each page. And underneath each app is our
workflow for how to get the project from the app
into Canvas. Some of them are a little
involved, up to 12 steps, but we’ve broken it down into the
most simple parts of steps that we possibly could. Just made a really easy to
follow, hopefully, and we’re hoping to add just above that
description somewhere kind of a video tutorial for our
teachers so that they can show their students how to work
through the process because students don’t like
to read, right? So we’ll create videos
for those. And that’s all coming
on our website. Also wanted to talk about
our workflow for this presentation. We created this entire
presentation, and we’re showing it from an iPad. So from each of our apps, we
took screenshots inside of the apps that we’ve demoed today and
exported them, opened them in Skitch to annotate and add
the pretty pink arrows. That was Rachel’s choice. Once we’ve annotated those in
Skitch, we saved them back to our camera roll. We opened them in either Haiku
Deck or Quick Office to be able to create the
presentations. We put the presentations
all together. We created different parts. And then when we should have
been working on this project and putting everything together,
we partied with MC Hammer a little too late
that first night. That was a surprise. And then we stayed up until
midnight last night putting this all together, and Rachel
got to stay here. I had to drive back to Salt Like
City and then come back. But that’s our workflow for
creating this presentation. It’s a little more complex than
just the straightforward build your project in one app
and save it to Canvas. But this could work as well. There are a lot of
ways to connect. The word that has been
used a lot is interoperability, right? The iPads really have come a
long way in allowing apps and other web tools to communicate
with each other. RACHEL MURPHY: So we decided to
stop at 25 apps because you have to stop somewhere when
you’re getting ready for a presentation. But like I said, we have
nearly 100 apps on the student iPad. So if you stay in touch on that
website, you will see it grow and develop and should be
a great resource for anyone trying to use iPads with
Canvas, with students. And I think we’re ready for
question and answer. JARED WARD: Yeah. AUDIENCE: What was your adoption
rate among teachers? And did you notice any
correlation between generations of teachers? Were they younger to
the other teachers? RACHEL MURPHY: I have to
repeat the question. What was the adoption rate? And what is the correlation
between adoption rate for younger teachers and
veteran teachers? OK. JARED WARD: This is one of my
favorite things to talk about. We have a pretty wide range of
teachers who are in our core group with this training,
and they’re amazing. It’s my favorite
part of my job. We go in and we say, we
have these ideas. What do you think? They say, yes, let’s do it. And then they start playing,
and they say, hey, we have this idea. We have this idea. So in that core group of
teachers who have the iPad carts, who have been developing
Canvas courses, we’ve been working with them
for quite a while. It’s, I would say, 100%
adoption rate. I mean, it’s phenomenal. It’s been, again, the best
experience that we’ve had. I think the iPads helped
breathe some energy. We’ve been working in Canvas,
and it had been kind of a long process. When the iPad showed up,
we had our first iPad training day. It was an eight-hour day,
and they just said, we want more of this. Can we do this again? And we have six more trainings
planned throughout the course of the next year, so it’s
been really good. RACHEL MURPHY: I do want to say
one thing on that though. With the adoption rate, we don’t
have all teachers that adopt the same things though. So one of our first Web 2.0
tools we did was VoiceThread, for example. And we had some teachers that
went right back and said, I can use this. This fits with what I do. This make sense to me. I like this format of a Web
2.0-type presentation. And then we have other teachers
that said, this isn’t something I would really do. But other things they do that
those other same teachers don’t do, so I wouldn’t say
that all the 100 apps have been adopted at the same rate,
but they find what fits with what they teach and
what they do. So that’s been kind of nice. JARED WARD: Right here. AUDIENCE: I’m so impressed with
the work that you created in [INAUDIBLE]. So first of all, thank
you for that. RACHEL MURPHY: You’re welcome. AUDIENCE: The question I had is
that you had mentioned that you are not in a one-to-one
cart [INAUDIBLE]. JARED WARD: Correct. AUDIENCE: So I was wondering as
to what your workload is if students coming into a period,
grabbing their iPads, how do you manage that with the email,
logging into all the different apps and the deck. Could you explain that
a little bit? RACHEL MURPHY: Yeah. So the question is, our workflow
for not being in a one to one in a classroom that
have iPads, how you manage student use on the iPads when
they don’t take it with them. So do you want– JARED WARD: We have a few
veteran teachers. We had one teacher that’s
in our group. She piloted our iPad implementation three years ago. She got the first set of iPads
in our district, and she trained the rest of the teachers
how to manage that. So she had a classroom
set first. We asked her to do the
training because she taught it the best. And so basically, the students
never touched the iPads in the cart. The teacher has them
out on a table. They pick up the iPad. They use it for the period. They sign into the things
that they need. We’re careful about that. We don’t give them too much
access, but we give them enough to get their work done. And then we’ve asked them to be
respectful of the material that’s on the iPad, and
so far they’ve been really good about that. We also asked them if there’s
someone signed into Instagram or Facebook on the iPad and they
come into class and it’s open, they take that iPad
straight to the teacher, so there’s no accountability on the
student for anything that might happen inside of
those very personal, private-type apps. So it’s a process. We’re still figuring that
out, but it’s been working fairly well. RACHEL MURPHY: I want to
share one tip with you from this on teacher. Her name is Karen Larson at
Brighton High if you want to Google search her. But she doesn’t have
all of the students come up to the iPad. She has like row leaders that
actually come and pick up six. She says six is just enough for
a student to carry back to the row and pass out to the
other students, so it’s not a mob on the cart. And then that same person brings
them back over to the cart and she puts them back
in to plug them in. I just thought that was kind of
creative so you don’t have a mob of students trying
to pick up your iPads. JARED WARD: I think we have
time for one more. AUDIENCE: What do you
use to set up and configure your iPads? RACHEL MURPHY: Yes. JARED WARD: The question was– RACHEL MURPHY: Oh, go ahead. JARED WARD: You do it because
this is all you. RACHEL MURPHY: What did
we do to set up and configure our iPads? So Configurator is not our
favorite part of the job, unlike the teachers we work and
the training that we’re doing with teachers
in classrooms. But we use the Apple
Configurator tool. And if you want to send me an
email, our links are on our first page of our Canvas. We have a manual that we created
for our teachers to walk through how you set
restrictions so that students can’t remove apps. They can’t add apps. They can’t add their own
account to add apps. AUDIENCE: What exactly, what
process did you go through? Did you have a sync station? RACHEL MURPHY: Yes. We have a cart that syncs
the 40 at a time. We use an Apple laptop that
has Configurator on it. And Configurator just basically
walks you through, which apps you put on, what
settings you put on, how much you lock down or
not lock down. We lock down a lot. We don’t want students messing
it up in the middle of the day for the next class. And so they have very little
control over what the iPad looks like. We have them organized into
folders so that the teachers can say, go to your
Images folder. Open this app so that that
process can work really smooth in classrooms. And I’d be glad to talk with
anybody that wants to talk more about that. I love Configurator and
I hate Configurator all at the same time. JARED WARD: Are we
out of time? RACHEL MURPHY: OK. JARED WARD: We just want to
end with one last thought. Again, the idea is that we’re
creating something that couldn’t have been created
before this technology walked into the classroom. That’s really our goal. So we’re hoping that what our
teachers do, what our students do, they’re able to share with
our community and hopefully out beyond that, so that you can
see, we can share, we can all learn together how to make
something more awesome than what we already have. So we’re not doing what
was said in the keynote this morning. We’re not just making digital
replications of what we’ve always been doing, and
that’s what we’re really hoping for this. If you have more questions,
we’ve posted our web link in the discussion forum inside
of the Instructor Canvas discussion board, and
we’re happy to answer questions there. We’ll stick around a little
bit after to questions. So thank you. RACHEL MURPHY: Thank
you for your time.

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