Nokia 8 Teardown – Screen Repair and Battery Replacement

Nokia 8 Teardown – Screen Repair and Battery Replacement


Nokia cellphones aren’t super mainstream in
the United States just yet, with only 5% of my video views coming from people stateside. The vast majority of you are watching from
India and Indonesia, but no matter where you’re from, this Nokia 8 is super interesting and
it’s time to review it from the inside. [Intro] With no visible screws on the outside of the
Nokia 8, heat is going to be our best friend when trying to get this thing open. Since I’m one of the first people ever to
open up this phone with no tutorials or guides, it’s kind of a cross your fingers and hope
for the best type of situation. I’ll get the screen to the point where it’s
just barely too hot to touch and I’ll slide my metal pry tool between the plastic antenna
line and the glass of the phone screen. I like to use the sharpness of a razor blade,
but to each their own. Avoid pressing the power button during this
process. Waking up the patient during surgery is not
an ideal situation. Once that initial insertion has been completed,
it gets a little easier. Using that same gap to slide my second tool
around the edge, carefully slicing through the warm adhesive while avoiding the display
of the phone. If the metal touches the display under the
glass, the display will shatter. So stick to the edges. I’ll keep warming up the phone as needed to
keep the glue soft. The bottom of the phone does have the capacitive
buttons, so don’t let your tool nick those either. The glass is pretty sturdy, so once the majority
of the adhesive has been cut, I can just twist my tool, leveraging the glass away from the
frame and lifting up. Definitely go slow and be careful. This thing is fragile. There are two ribbon cables holding the display
to the body of the phone. The first big one is attached under the center
metal bracket with it’s two screws. I’ll set that bracket off to the side while
keeping the screws organized of course. And I’ll unsnap the little battery ribbon
cable first, just like a little Lego, from the motherboard. Using a plastic pry tool since it is a battery
connection with power to it. After that’s off, I’ll unsnap the bigger ribbon
that goes up to the screen. There’s one more screw at the bottom of the
display for the buttons. I’ll unscrew that bracket and then lift that
over and out, putting it next to the screw it came with so it doesn’t get mixed up or
lost. And now the screen is free from the body. This is what replacement screens will probably
look like. I’ll link these in the video description as
they become available, along with the tools that I’m using during this repair. You’ll need a good screwdriver because there
are 19 screws holding the mid-plate to the frame. And these screws are different sizes, so lay
them out in the same shape as they are inside the phone, that way they can be put back in
the same hole they came from during the reassembly. Lifting up the graphite plate from the bottom
of the phone allows us to pull the top out at an angle, releasing the whole plate from
the frame. I think this design is brilliant. Not only is the screen relatively easy to
remove and replace, but the battery is in its own separate frame. This frame also includes the copper heat pipe
which I’ll show more of in a second, but it was interesting to see that the thermal paste
applied to the graphite panel is next to the heat pipe and not right on top of the copper. Personally, I think it would be a bit more
efficient if the processor and thermal paste were directly connected with the copper instead
of just the graphite, since copper has better heat conductivity, but either way, this setup
will probably get the job done just fine. It’s nice that the battery is in it’s own
little frame. This means that no amount of prying will damage
the display or the internal electronics of the phone since they aren’t anywhere close
to the battery at the moment. There are no magic pull tabs like we’ve seen
on some of the iPhones, but the adhesive doesn’t have a death grip on the battery either, and
it can be pried out using just the flat end of my metal pry tool, taking special care
not to puncture anything of course. Pretty sure this is the biggest heat pipe
I’ve ever seen inside of a phone. Maybe it’s not positioned over the processor
because so much of it’s underneath the battery, and Nokia doesn’t want the battery and processor
connected with the same heat sink. Removing the motherboard so we can get a look
at the exclusive Nokia “bothie” cameras. We have 4 screws along the top of the phone. I’ll keep these separated from the 22 screws
we’ve already removed. And there’s one large standoff screw at the
bottom of the motherboard. We’ve seen this situation on some of the iPhones,
I just grab a flathead screwdriver and twist it off at an angle, like you’re seeing here,
then I’ll set it next to the other 26 screws that we’ve removed. The SIM and SD card tray can be taken out. This can also be preformed as step number
one, if you’re into that kind of thing. And then I’ll unsnap the ribbon cable along
the right side of the motherboard, just like a little Lego. The whole motherboard can shift down to clear
the little grooves in the frame, and then tilt it up to disconnect some stuff along
the bottom edge. The volume button ribbon is first. And then on the back side we have a circular
antenna wire, the charging port ribbon, and another signal wire on the side of the motherboard. The snaky headphone jack ribbon you see here
is rather interesting. It coils along the frame of the motherboard
bringing together the headphone jack, the camera flash, and the rear sensors all into
one cable. Looking at the rear facing cameras, the upper
lens is that monochrome sensor with no OIS. And the bottom lens is the main 13 megapixel
sensor with OIS. Personally, I think a wide angle or telephoto
camera lens would be slightly more useful than the monochrome, but to each their own. The camera is replaceable and pops off as
one complete unit. No OIS on the front facing camera, but that’s
pretty normal. Moseying our way down to the charging port,
we have an additional 3 screws, and then one more little guy on the right side. This one actually doesn’t need to come out,
but I’m going to do it anyway. I’ll unclip the signal wires and then lift
up the super wide charging port extension cable, allowing us additional access to pull
out the loudspeaker housing out of the milled aluminum. The loudspeaker has a little splash resistant
ip54 screen at the bottom. This is just a reminder not to trust this
phone anywhere around water. Ip54 doesn’t mean much. The charging port has the USB-C connector,
and the microphone with it’s own little water screen. It’s nice that the charging port can be replaced
if needed, even if you have to unscrew 30 screws to get it. And now it’s time to see if the whole thing
still works after I put it back together. The loudspeaker is in place, and the charging
port tucks in over the top of the black plastic with the 4 little screws holding it all into
the frame. The motherboard has it’s own series of connectors
along the bottom, just like that signal wire along the edge, and the one at the bottom,
as well as the charging port ribbon. It’s pretty hard to connect all these little
guys, but after they’re in, I can tuck the motherboard up into the top edge of the Nokia
8 frame. And get that headphone jack ribbon plugged
in on the front side. The SIM and SD card tray can go back in the
slot they came from. And I’ll get that large stand off screw at
the bottom of the motherboard using my flathead screwdriver. There are 4 screws along the top edge of the
motherboard, and the one on the far right has it’s own gold bracket connecting it to
the frame. And lastly I’ll plug in the little Lego connector
at the bottom for the volume and power buttons. I’ve tucked the black signal wire into the
grooves along the edge of the frame to make room for the battery and mid-plate, which
gets set into place by tucking the top end first and getting those 19 screws back all
along the edges. Remember, most of these screws are different,
so if it feels too tight, you’re probably going in the wrong hole. Grabbing the screen, I’ll get the capacitive
buttons plugged in at the bottom of the phone first with it’s little metal latch and small
screw holding it down tight. And finally the screen ribbon gets lined up
and plugged into the motherboard, followed by the battery connection. At this point I will purposefully wake up
the patient from anesthesia to see if everything’s in place and functioning. Turning on is a good sign, so I’ll continue
with the metal bracket and the final two screws of the whole operation. A new screen will probably come with it’s
own adhesive, but if you plan on reusing your old screen, you’ll need some double-sided
tape to hold it in place again. This is definitely not the easiest phone to
repair. Even the Nokia 6 felt a little bit easier. But it does have most of the features we have
come to expect on flagship Androids. And the screen and battery replacements can
be preformed easy enough, so it gets a thumbs up from me. Hit that subscribe button if you haven’t already. I’d love to have you around. And let me know in the comments if you have
any questions. Oh, and let me know in the comments what country
you are watching from. I’m curious. Thanks a ton for watching and I’ll see you
around.

100 thoughts on “Nokia 8 Teardown – Screen Repair and Battery Replacement

  1. Iam watching from Germany 😉

  2. Thank you for helping me change my screen, Watching from UK.

  3. Philippines

  4. Im from the uk

  5. I'am from Indonesia

  6. i am from pakistan

  7. India

  8. Nokia 8 Sirocco teardown please

  9. From Serbia. Great video, love it!

  10. I am from India

  11. I am from the UK

  12. Hello Jerry, greetings from Czech Rep. Thanks for the great video 🙂 I've got just one remark as you mentioned the IP54: it's nothing quite impressive, as you've said, but the Nokia 8 can surprise regarding this. My phone fell into water ending fully immersed for some seconds. Still, after some rest in a bowl of dry rice and some time of phantom haphazard touches on the soft buttons the phone returned to normal operation without need for any disassembling 🙂

  13. From Saudi Arabia

  14. Wow that’s very spectacular phone, o iya in the Nokia website, I checked the battery is 3090 but I saw in your video, the battery is 3030, why’s different? Watching your video from Indonesia 🇮🇩 thanks

  15. Watching from Bulgaria. Dropped my Nokia 8 the other day and now I have to change the screen.

  16. Indian

  17. My Nokia 8 battery needs replacement so i went to Nokia care, i was told that since they need to warm up the device for opening it there is a risk of screen failure. And if that happens I need to pay for that as well. 🙁 .. I'm watching this video from India.

  18. Can you just go in from behind? I have to replace the charge port on Nokia 7.1 and I just wondering since there's no videos on it. Probably exzact same concept though.

  19. I am from LOMBOK INDONESIA

  20. i have faced problem of display touch screen after replacement the battery of Nokia 8. Please give me suggestion how to solve this problem?

  21. I am watching from Greece

  22. "so if it feels too tight you're probably going in the wrong hole"

    Zach 2018.
    Nigeria btw

  23. Indiaaaaa

  24. I am from Germany

  25. india

  26. watching from Philippines … got question how to repair it keep on restarting camera malfunction and broken sounds since it updated to oreo os ive read many comments and we have all same issues on Nokia8

  27. Watching from isreal

  28. From the Netherlands

  29. I am from Pakistan

  30. JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO JUST LIKE A LITTLE LEGO

  31. i am from India.
    i like these tear down videos and its really informative
    please tear down a Realme X Smartphone

  32. Thanks… And i am from Bangladesh

  33. ASSAM, INDIA

  34. PAKISTAN 🇵🇰🇵🇰🇵🇰

  35. Watching from Philippines. I'm always watching your teardown videos Zach. 😁

  36. Watching from france🇫🇷

  37. Watching from Nokia 8 itself ❤️

  38. from LAHORE PAKISTAN

  39. I'm from Peru

  40. Im from india

  41. Am watching from Nigeria

  42. Nokia Sirocco's teardown ?

  43. I watch almost all your videos, from India

  44. Am watching from country Ghana

  45. Watching from Romania

  46. Because of this teardown, I finally decided buying a Nokia 8

  47. Indian 😎

  48. from nepal

  49. India

  50. Watching from India !! I'm using Nokia 8 😊

  51. Now this Aussie knows knows why his screws are tight, its the wrong hole.

  52. From India

  53. Watching from the Philippines with my Nokia 8…..

  54. Sir I am troubleing from half display problem . Tell me what should I do

  55. And I am from india

  56. USA USA USA

  57. Bangladesh

  58. Watching my lg k10 in indonesia

  59. Philippines with Nokia 5.1 plus

  60. love to watch your videos – from iran

  61. Tomorow i GO to buy one

  62. Poland

  63. Good one @JerryRigEverything

  64. Watching From Nigeria

  65. Australia mate

  66. Getting turned on is a good sign

  67. sir, can you suggest where i can get an original nokia 8 screen replacement,,,, my nokia 8 is broken but in here is indonesia i cant find an original one.. event on nokia care they dont have it…

    thank for help

  68. Nice! Watching from Belgium!

  69. Watching from Sweden.

  70. Nice useful video.
    Would be nice to have shown the removal and re install of the Capacitive buttons in more detail as these seem to be a major weakness of the Nokia8.

  71. Wow i watch this in the nokia 8

  72. I AM A BIG FAN OF YOU & NOKIA ALSO, FROM INDIA!

  73. Your videos is so good, and informative. Thanks from Denmark.

  74. Nothing wrong with going in the wrong hole 😆

  75. Is there anyone from Nepal?
    Watching on my Nokia 7.1

  76. What are those copper pads on the display cable? Thank you

  77. Watching from Australia, Cheers mate

  78. India

  79. Watching from india

  80. I enjoy your smartphone teardown videos. When you gonna do one of the Nokia 7.1 (2018)?

  81. Could you help I have Nokia 8 but it's bottom buttons are not working ?

  82. I am watching from Romania. Using the Nokia 8 to watch this video.

  83. Quebec!

  84. Uruguayan visitor!

  85. Thanks for the video….

  86. Iam from🇵🇰🇵🇰🇵🇰🇵🇰

  87. Watching from Taiwan………………..a young man that looking for NOKIA 8's NFC location🤣🤣

  88. From India

  89. Thanks from Germany

  90. Need teardown of Sirocco

  91. Watching from India and from nokia 8😅😅😆😆😆

  92. India.
    India.
    India.
    Big fan of you Jerry..

  93. I'm from Sri Lanka

  94. Thanks for the tutorial. I need to replace my Nokia 8 battery. Has been restarting by itself since 3 months ago. I read in forum, its battery problem. Might need to try this out.

  95. Watching from uk

  96. Jerry Rigs is like the Hoby Buchanon of phones

  97. I'm watching from Australia

  98. Hey Zack @jerryrigseverything, I am big fan of yours and I am from India.

  99. Thanks from Down under (Australia)
    I have a Nokia 8 that needs a microphone replacment.
    Cheers keep up the good work very helpful video.

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